On behalf for UMNO, Dr James Miring says a big THANK YOU and TAHNIAH to SNAP for pissing the Dayak votes!

So now Dr James Miring himself simply confirm the truth: SNAP = UMNO!

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Rejoin BN, Masing advises SNAP
The Borneo Post, Sunday 17 April 2011

KUCHING: SNAP should consider rejoining BN to make the party relevant again, suggested PRS president Dato Sri Dr James Jemut Masing yesterday.

“If they don’t do it (rejoin BN), they can consider closing shop,” said Masing.

Masing pointed out that the message SNAP conveyed to the electorate in the April 16 polls was outdated.

“SNAP has been away (from mainstream politics) for far too long. It has no network to convey its message to the people and the party’s campaigning method was not even working,” he told reporters.

He reiterated that it would be wise for the party’s leadership to stop whatever they were doing right now and rejoin the ruling coalition.

“I would like to advise SNAP to start cooperating with the BN again. Join us to strengthen BN for the next parliamentary and state elections.”

Yesterday, Masing retained Baleh with a 3,898-vote majority, beating Bendindang Manjah of PKR in a straight fight. He garnered 5,242 votes while Bendindang managed only 1,344 votes.___________________

Thrashed SNAP now an embarrassment
Joseph Tawie, FMT, 18 April 2011

Its past glory was not enough to keep Sarawak Nasional Party alive in the recently concluded Sarawak elections.

KUCHING: After a severe beating in Saturday’s polls, Sarawak National Party (SNAP) has now withdrawn into a corner licking its wounds.

“This defeat is not only shameful, but questions are being asked whether the party continues to be relevant or not,” said a former SNAP minister and leader.

The leader, who refused to be named, was an assistant minister in the good old days of the party in 1970s and 1980s.

All the 27 candidates of the party lost heavily in the rural areas which it claimed to be its traditional homeground and strongholds.

Except for Tedong Anak Gunda in Pakan, all of its candidates including its president Edwin Dundang lost their deposits.

Dundang managed to secure 281 votes in the party’s so-called stronghold since September 1963 until November 2002 – a period of 39 years.

In Pakan, Tedong Gunda secured 2,741 votes. He was up against five-term incumbent SPDP president William Mawan Ikom.

SNAP had reportedly focused its might on Pakan, hoping to win the seat and redeem itself in the eyes of the public following disclosures that it was being secretly funded by the Barisan Nasional (BN).

The recently concluded state election was SNAP’s second outing (the first was in 2006) after it was forced to leave the BN.

Following this crisis, SNAP’s fortunes began to dip after nine of its elected representatives and senior party leaders left the party to form Sarwak Progressive Democratic Party (SPDP) due to the leadership crisis in 2002.

With this boost, SPDP was immediately accepted to join the Sarawak BN.

Cocky SNAP

Adding to SNAP’s problem was the fact that it had been deregistered by the Registrar of Societies, a move allegedly engineered by Chief Minsiter Taib Mahmud.

But the party appealed for a stay of execution.

Following the Court of Appeal’s decision to remove the ROS’s order (dereigstration) in June last year, SNAP started to rebrand and rejunavate itself, riding on its past glory.

Its re-branding campaign earlier this year attracted a number of ex-Parti Bansa Dayak Sarawak (PBDS) leaders as well as some financiers from peninsular Malaysia.

But things were not moving even though some financial resources had been given to them.

Their lack of planning and speed forced some financial supporters to withdraw.

Also noted were the fact that educated Dayak leaders with political potential were reluctant to join the party under the existing leadership.

The bickering between SNAP and PKR, too, did not help.

“Talking big” SNAP had insisted that it should be the dominant party in Sarawak and not PKR or DAP.

“We must be given the leading role in Sarawak Pakatan Rakyat,” Dudang had reportedly said, adding that “the party with its glorious past and representing the Dayak communiuty should take the lead”.

Dundang, who boasted that SNAP “had branches statewide” with 123,000 memebers, said SNAP was “insulted by PKR”, which offered the former three seats to contest in the spirit of partnership.

Dundang had demanded that PKR stay away from the 48 constitituencies, 29 of which were Dayak-majority seats, it was constesting in.

SNAP secretary-general Stanley Jugol had even suggested that PKR candidates should contest using SNAP’s symbol.

“We are more popular than PKR,” he had stubbornly declared.

PKR, however, was adamant. It had been preparing for this state election since 2006. It knew the turf better.

On Saturday, PKR won three seats, two more than their win in 2006. But wins, they nonetheless were.

The party contested in 49 seats and its candidates were the only real rivals to Sarawak BN.

Sarawak BN won 55 seats while the opposition coalition of DAP, PKR and PAS won 16 seats. An independent in Pelagus won one seat. PAS lost in all five seats it contested in.
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SNAP wipeout spells end of party
The New Straits Times, 17 April 2011

PRIOR to Saturday’s state election, the 50-year-old Sarawak National Party (SNAP) claimed that it was the only party that could unite the Dayak community.

But Saturday’s results proved otherwise. SNAP lost in all the 27 seats it contested and a majority of its candidates lost their deposits.

Party president Edwin Dundang only secured 281 votes, just slightly ahead of independent Michael Ding Tuah in a three-cornered contest in Marudi and lost his deposit.

The seat was won by Sylvester Entri Muran of Barisan Nasional with a majority of 3,202 votes.

One thing is certain, the opposition’s pact of “3+1” (PKR, DAP and Pas plus SNAP) failed.

The failure to agree on seat allocations led to Parti Keadilan Rakyat and SNAP contesting against each other in 24 constituencies — Opar, Tasik Biru, Bengoh, Tarat, Tebedu, Kedup, Simunjan, Lingga, Balai Ringin, Bukit Begunan, Engkilili, Layar, Bukit Saban, Krian, Meluan, Ngemah, Machan, Katibas, Belaga, Jepak, Kemena, Bekenu, Lambir, Marudi, Telang Usan and Batu Danau.

And for this, SNAP was accused of splitting the opposition’s votes.

Ironically, Dundang once said that SNAP should lead the opposition’s struggle in Sarawak, as it was a genuine local party and was there when Malaysia was formed.

It was the third party to be formed after Sarawak United Peoples’ Party and the defunct Parti Negara Sarawak. The first chief minister was from SNAP, the late Stephen Kalong Ningkan (1963-66).

But it appears now the Dayak community is throwing its support behind PKR and BN.

In Krian, for example, PKR’s Ali Biju won the four-cornered fight against BN’s Peter Nyarok Entrie, SNAP’s Liman Sujang and independent Banyi Beriak.

While SNAP may seem relevant to a small section of the community, the defeat is a sign that it is all over for SNAP. With the rural folk giving importance to bread-and-butter issues, basic amenities and job opportunities, they naturally have greater confidence in BN.

The village folk in Ulu Medamit in Limbang, for instance, believe that only the BN government would be able to fulfil their wish for better roads, water and electricity supply.

The village is in the Batu Danau constituency, which saw BN’s Paulus Gumbang garnering 3,667 votes to defeat PKR’s Dr Lau Liak Kor (1,348) and SNAP’s Lawrence Cosmas (140).

As for the urban Dayak, they seem to echo the same sentiment as other urban voters, analysts said.

That was partly how DAP managed to not only retain three of the four seats in Kuching city that it won in 2006, but also unseat BN’s SUPP candidate in the Batu Kawah seat.

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SNAP snipes at PKR over loss
By SIRA HABIBU,The Star, Monday April 18, 2011

PETALING JAYA: SNAP is blaming PKR for its comprehensive defeat in the Sarawak elections.

SNAP secretary-general Stanley Jugol claimed that PKR had gone on a media and blog campaign to attack the party.

“PKR should have trained its guns on Barisan Nasional, not us.

“We were caught between Barisan’s massive vote-buying campaign and PKR’s relentless attacks,’’ Stanley said when commenting on SNAP’s failure to secure a single seat in the state polls.

SNAP was engaged in a multi-cornered fight with PKR and Barisan in 24 out of the 26 seats it contested.

Stanley expressed disappointment at PKR for refusing to “give and take”.

“We pulled out of contesting in Ba’Kelalan so that (Sarawak PKR chief) Baru Bian could stand a better chance of winning in a straight fight. And true enough, Baru won by a 473-vote majority against Barisan (candidate Willie Liau).

“But PKR never gave up any seat for any of our key leaders,’’ he said.

Stanley said PKR had the resources to go against the mighty Barisan machinery.

SNAP, he said, would decide on the next course of action after it conducted a post-mortem.

Asked if the party would continue working with Pakatan Rakyat, Stanley said they would come to a consensus after the post-mortem.

Meanwhile, PAS youth chief Nasrudin Hassan said the party was contented with its performance in Sarawak although it failed to win any of the five seats it had contested.

He said the party had made in-roads in Sarawak as it had obtained more popular votes.

It garnered 1,002 votes in Tanjung Datu, Sadong Jaya (1,074), Sebuyau (1,769), Beting Maro (2,678) and Muara Tuang (3,196).

“Getting more than 1,000 votes is a massive improvement for us.

“We have come a long way from when we were chased out by parang-wielding villagers more than a decade ago,” he said.

Three parties that failed to secure any seat were SNAP, PAS and PCM.

Barisan won 55 seats, followed by DAP (12) and PKR (3).

An Independent also won a seat.
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MoCS chief: SNAP deserves to lose
The Borneo Post, Monday 18 April 2011

KUCHING: Movement for Change Sarawak (MoCS) said Sarawak National Party (SNAP) deserved to lose all 26 seats they contested in because they have forsaken MoCS and Pakatan Rakyat’s efforts in implementing the Agenda for Change.

Its leader Francis Paul Siah told The Borneo Post yesterday that he had been proven right on his prediction that SNAP would get ‘zero’ in the just concluded election.

SNAP’s rout in all seats was sweeter for MoCS when 25 out of SNAP candidates lost their deposit for failing to obtain 12 per cent of the total votes cast in the constituencies they contested in.

Only Jamal Abdullah alias Tedung escaped the default rule when he garnered 2,741 votes only to lose to Sarawak Progressive Democratic Party president Dato Sri William Mawan Ikom in Pakan.

Siah said: “I ‘ve told you that SNAP will get zero. They have betrayed MoCS and Pakatan.”

Siah at one particular time  also threatened to lodge police report against SNAP members for graft allegation.

He also said that he suspected SNAP was sponsored by influential figures close to Umno in their move to topple the State BN after SNAP appeared to have the financial means to ensure that their candidates could stand in the 26 seats.

On average SNAP candidates only got  600 votes in each of the  26 seats contested.

Even their party chief Edwin Dundang Bugak lost badly in Marudi to BN-SPDP candidate Sylvester Entrie Muran when the former only obtained 281 votes.

Mathematically SNAP lost a total of RM125,000 in deposits and got a total of 15,660 votes from all 26 constituencies it contested.
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SNAP denies secret arrangement with BN
The New Straits Times, 24 March 2011

KUCHING: The Sarawak National Party (SNAP) has dismissed an article in news portal Sarawak Report that it was involved in a ‘secret pact’ with Barisan Nasional (BN) for the coming state election.

The article, ‘SNAP’s Deal with BN’, alleged that the dayak-majority party had a secret meeting with BN representatives to negotiate an “arrangement”.

Describing it as a fabrication of the worst order, SNAP secretary-general Stanley Jugol said:

“The article is the work of a department of dirty tricks designed to weaken SNAP, just as it is getting ready for the coming state election.

“Furthermore, there was never any meeting between Umno information chief Datuk Ahmad Mazlan and SNAP leaders or representatives recently.

“The author (of the article) wants to destroy SNAP as a viable political party. This is naughty and vicious,” he said in a statement here today.

Jugol said SNAP’s objective was to unite the native people, particularly the dayaks, under a single political umbrella, he said.

SNAP was founded in 1961. – BERNAMA

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Proxy fight talk rubbished
By Churchill Edward, The Borneo Post, Thursday 24 February 2011

Supposed backstabbing tactic by PRS described as an attempt to weaken BN

KUCHING: Parti Rakyat Sarawak (PRS) yesterday rubbished the claim by a political observer that the party would sponsor several proxy independents to challenge Parti Pesaka Bumiputera Bersatu (PBB) candidates in the next state election.

Obviously not amused by the ‘preposterous claim’, PRS secretary-general Datuk Wilfred Rata Nissom described the idea as child play.

“Ridiculous! The idea sounds childish,” he said.

He said there were persons in the political arena who just wanted to put a wedge between the Dayak-dominant PRS and state Barisan Nasional (BN) backbone party PBB so that the coalition would become unstable.

PRS president Dato Sri Dr James Masing said the party indulged neither in backstabbing nor proxy fight in elections.

“We honour our commitment to fight as a team against the Opposition. No one should doubt or question our commitment in pursuing this cause,” he said.

Knowing very well that such claim would work to the Opposition’s advantage, Parti Keadilan Rakyat (PKR) state liaison chief Baru Bian said: “No comment.”

Another PKR leader, Padungan assemblyman Dominique Ng claimed such scenario painted by the unidentified political observer is ‘Sarawak political style’.

Ng, who is PKR Bandar Kuching division chairman, said BN versus BN in elections had happened many times.

He cited Sarawak United People’s Party (SUPP) affairs in the 1970s as examples.

“It (BN proxy contest) had happened many times in the past and it will happen again in future.

“Remember the famous SUPP-backed independent Temenggong Tan Meng Chong who stood and won Padungan (in 1979 state election) in a five-cornered fight against DAP’s Sim Kwang Yang and BN candidate who came in third?”

‘State election might see proxy fight between two BN component parties’

“Indeed SUPP put up several winnable independents to the extent they succeeded in snatching Padungan back from SNAP which was then in BN,” he said.

“SUPP also in 1974 laid their claim on Padungan with their famous Lo Foot Kee’s win over BN’s Stephen Yong, the then deputy chief minister,” he claimed.

On condition of anonymity last Monday, the political observer said the coming state election might see a proxy fight between two component parties of BN.

He claimed that the bone of contention is the Pelagus issue involving its incumbent assemblyman Larry Sng who apparently is wanted by the government to stay put but not by the party that sacked him in 2008 for insubordination.

Sng is also an assistant minister in the Chief Minister’s Department and he holds three portfolios.

According to the political observer, former information chief of PRS Tedewin Ngumbang is already set to lead a group of independents to take on PBB candidates, starting with Deputy Chief Minister Datuk Patinggi Tan Sri Alfred Jabu Numpang who is most likely to be re-nominated by BN to defend Layar.

The political observer reasoned that the move by Tedewin in not joining SNAP (Sarawak National Party) and linking himself to a group of independents was ground for suspicion.

The group, according to the political observer, has declared their interest in six seats belonging to PBB.

A news portal last Saturday even quoted Tedewin as saying that he would be contesting against Jabu.

The political observer pointed out the fact that Tedewin still maintains a good relationship with the leadership of ‘a certain BN component’ (read PRS) makes him look the likely candidate to carry out the proxy fight against PBB.

On Tedewin, PRS deputy information chief Richard Wil said he did not actually know what Tedewin wanted.

“I thought he has enough from Dr Masing as compared to some people,” he said.

What appeared to be proxy fights also occurred during 2004 parliamentary election involving Parti Bansa Dayak Sarawak (PBDS) and several independents who claimed to be sponsored by a BN-linked group in all PBDS parliamentary constituencies.

The group lost to PBDS but the party was deregistered subsequently and its place in BN was replaced by PRS.

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